What is Temporary Total Disability Compensation?

construction-workerYou get injured at work and lose a significant amount of wages due to multiple missed days. How are you going to pay your bills? How are you going to recover those lost wages? Getting assistance from experienced attorneys when it comes to filing and processing your workers’ compensation claim is pivotal to recovering your lost wages and recovering from your work-related injury.

How does an individual get compensated for loss of work from a work-related injury?

Temporary total disability compensation is usually the first form of compensation an injured worker may be awarded after filing a workers’ compensation claim. The Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation (BWC) defines temporary total disability as the temporary inability of the injured worker to return to their former position of employment and to perform the job duties as they existed on the date of injury. Temporary total disability compensation is a benefit paid to replace lost income due to a work-related injury when a worker cannot return to their former position of employment solely based on the allowed conditions of their claim if the worker has not reached maximum medical improvement or has been released to work with restrictions (by a physician) but their employer cannot provide them with work.

(See also: What do I do if I’m injured at work?)

However, even though temporary total disability compensation is a benefit paid to replace lost income due to a work-related injury, there are different requirements for the BWC (or self-insuring employer) to follow based upon the number of days of work missed. For example, if you suffer a work-related injury that results in you losing seven or fewer calendar days of work, the BWC (or self-insuring employer) will pay related medical expenses but not compensation to replace your lost wages. On the other hand, if you lose eight or more calendar days of work, the BWC (or self-insuring employer) will pay related medical expenses and may pay temporary total compensation for lost wages beginning on the eighth day of injury. Finally, if you lose fourteen consecutive days of work due to your work-related injury, the BWC (or self-insuring employer) will pay you for the first seven days of lost work as well as the other days missed due to your injury.

Payment of temporary total disability compensation is based on an averaging of wages during certain periods of time prior to your injury and is subject to a statewide maximum amount for the year, with any applicable offsets. The rules can be confusing, especially if you are trying to focus on getting better, so let the attorneys at Arenstein & Andersen Co., LPA help you get the assistance you need in order for you to get the compensation you deserve.

About Arenstein & Andersen Co., LPA

Arenstein & Andersen Co., LPA, located in Dublin, Ohio, has experience with a wide array of workers’ compensation claims. The attorneys at Arenstein & Andersen Co., LPA are able to provide experienced legal advice and provide assistance with your claim and will help navigate you through the complicated rules and laws that are currently in place in the State of Ohio when it comes to workers’ compensation.